Store Specific Technical Information

What is a U-Bolt and how do I measure them?

U-Bolts

U-Bolts are probably the most common type of pipe support, but there are many styles within the category.

Trying to determine the correct size u-bolt for your application can be a daunting task. Part of this is to do with old pipework engineering speak. U-bolts are traditionally used to clamp pipes into place. Pipes are tubes and engineers who design pipe systems are wholly concentrated on the inside of the tube – because from there they can determine how much fluid or gas can flow through the pipe.

Makes sense – for them. So they will ask for a u-bolt to clamp a “50 nominal bore pipe” which means “Please can I have a U-bolt that will hold a pipe that has an inside diameter of 50 mm” Now, a British standard pipe with 50 mm inside diameter will have a 60.3 mm outside diameter.

So “Please can I have a U-bolt that will hold a pipe that has an inside diameter of 50 mm” actually means “Please can I have a U-bolt that will hold a pipe that has an outside diameter of 60.3 mm

Still with us? So to hold that 50 Nominal bore pipe actually needs a u-bolt that has between 65 and 70 mm depending on how much clamping is to take place

This is why traditionally, u-bolts are labelled the way they are – in Nominal Bore – all very frustrating for non pipe work engineers

Graphskill SUMS (GSUMS)

So step forward Graphskill SUMS, the new and best way to measure a u-bolt. Using this diagram we can see the key elements:

Graphskill SUMS : U-bolt

Graphskill SUMS : U-bolt

  • Material / finish
  • Thread size / bar Diameter
  • Thread Length
  • Inside Diameter (Distance between the legs)
  • Inside height

Those five qualities will uniquely define any u-bolt and Graphskill are now utilising that in our naming conventions

Old Convention: T304 Stainless Steel 50 Nominal Bore British Standard gripping u-bolt (Only the dedicated expert will understand that)

New Convention: U-Bolt M10 *35mm Thread, 65mm Inside Diameter, 96mm Inside Height T304 Stainless Steel

Anyone should be able to read that and know if it will suit their needs

So for example:

Thread Size=M

Inside Diameter=D

Inside Height=H

Thread Length=T

Graphskill SUMS= UBOLT/MATERIAL/M*D*H*T

Example: UBOLT/GALV/M6*34*75*20


What is a pipe clamp and how do I measure them?

Pipe clamps

Pipe clamps are used to clamp a pipe to a flat surface – traditionally of two styles, grip type (anchor) or Non-grip type (saddle / guide).

Grip or Anchor clamp: used when the pipe requires a tight clamping to restrict all movements. You can see in the image below how there is no gap between the pipe and the inner surface of the clamp.

Grip / Anchor Style Pipe Clamp

Grip / Anchor Style Pipe Clamp

Non-Grip or Saddle / guide clamp: used when it is desirable to have a looser fit to allow some movement. Movement could be thermal or mechanical (perhaps a vibration). Below is a representative image showing a gap between the pipe and the clamp. Realistically there would likely be contact at the top surface.

Non-Grip [Saddle/Guide] Style Pipe Clamp

Non-Grip [Saddle/Guide] Style Pipe Clamp

Traditionally pipe clamps were referenced by the size of the pipe they were clamping. So for example an engineer would ask for a pipe clamp for a 50 nominal bore pipe. No reference to the size of the clamp, thickness of the material, size of the holes etc.

Graphskill Sums

Graphskill Sums (GSUMS) is the new way of labelling pipe clamps (Read More about GSUMS)

Pipe clamp drawing for Graphskill Sums

Pipe clamp drawing for Graphskill Sums

Inside Diameter=D

Inside height=C

Material Width=W

Material thickness=T

Hole centres=A

Hole centre to edge=B

Hole diameter=E

So the code for a pipe clamp becomes: Graphskill SUMS=CLAMP/MATL/D-W*T-C-A-B-E

Example:  CLAMP/T304/64-40*8-63-140-30-14

This clearly defines the physical dimensions of the clamp. Grip or non grip becomes meaningless as the engineer knows the outside diameter of the pipe. So for example, in the above example if the outside diameter of the pipe is 63 mm, the engineer could ask for Inside Diameter=D = 64 as above, or if they wanted a non-grip style they could ask for Inside Diameter=D = 68 (or whatever clearance they require)


What is a pipe clip and how do I measure them?

Pipe Clips

Standard pipe clips are usually either 2 bolt clips or 3 bolt clips. Basically they are two halves that are bolted together around a pipe.

2 Bolt Pipe Clip

A 2 bolt pipe clip comes in two halves, and as can be seen in the diagram, has two bolts, one either side of the pipe to join the two halves together

Standard 2 Bolt Pipe Clip

Standard 2 Bolt Pipe Clip

Standard 2 Bolt Pipe Clip Diagram

Standard 2 Bolt Pipe Clip Diagram

These are typically used with a hanger rod to suspend the pipe. However they can also be used with a shoe or base plate.

Pipe SaddlePipe SaddlePipe Saddle


3 Bolt Pipe Clip

Like the 2 bolt pipe clip, the 3 bolt pipe clip comes in two halves, as can be seen in the diagram. However it has three bolts, one either side of the pipe, and one towards the end of an extended arm to join the two halves together

Standard 3 Bolt Pipe Clip

Standard 3 Bolt Pipe Clip

Standard 3 Bolt Pipe Clip Diagram

Standard 3 Bolt Pipe Clip Diagram

These would often be used where the pipe is perhaps insulated, so that the hanger rod would be outside of the insulation


Traditionally pipe clips were referenced by the size of the pipe they were clamping. So for example an engineer would ask for a pipe clip for a 50 nominal bore pipe. No reference to the size of the clip, thickness of the material, size of the holes etc.

Graphskill Sums

Graphskill Sums (GSUMS) is the new way of labelling pipe clips (Read More about GSUMS)

Graphskill SUMS : 2-bolt pipe clipInside Diameter=D

Clip Width=W

Clip Thickness=T

Hole Centres=P

Hole centre to Edge=G

Gap Between halves=R

Bolt Diameter Size=M

 


So the code for the pipe clamp becomes: Graphskill SUMS=CLIPS/MATERIAL/D-W*T-P-G-R-M

Example : CLIPS/T304/224-65*12-320-36-12-M24

This clearly defines the physical dimensions of the clip.


What is a bossed pipe clip / clamp - Graphskill's very own 1205 Series Munsen Rings

1205 Series Stainless Steel Pipe Support System

Graphskill have a patented, modular stainless steel pipe support system – the 1205 series. It was developed to accommodate the many different types of pipe support designs which have proven expensive to adopt in stainless steel. The unique design enables a multitude of design options all based on the Series 1205 bossed clip

The Series 1205 can be used to clamp, guide or hang pipes in position with a minimum of basic components

Advantages of the Series 1205 system

1205 Series Modular Pipe Clamps

1205 Series Modular Pipe Clamps

  • Availability – Stainless steel ex stock, non-standard within 24 hours
  • One basic component to for many supporting arrangements
  • Versatile
  • Space and cost saving
  • No Dissimilar metal considerations
  • Easy insulation
  • Load distribution
  • No limitations on clip manufacture size
  • Matrix development – single or multiple pipe lines can be easily accommodated
1205 Series Bossed Pipe Clamp Munsen Style)

1205 Series Bossed Pipe Clamp Munsen Style)

 The 1205 can be used :

  • as anchors where it is necessary to hold the pipe in all directions
  • as guides where it is undesirable to restrict longitudinal movement
  • in hanging applications
  • in matrix formation

Bossed Pipe Clamp

What is a bossed pipe clamp? Sometimes called Munsen rings, bossed pipe clamps are very similar to a two bolt pipe clip, but with threaded boss attached. The threaded boss allows the pipe clamp to be fixed to a base plate via a length of studding.

The added advantage is the matrix – connect multiple clamps together in different orientations allows for great flexibility.

Bossed pipe clamp

Bossed pipe clamp

Bossed pipe clamp matrix solution

Bossed pipe clamp matrix solution

The Graphskill Series 1205 (Patent No. 824062971 Stainless Steel Pipe Support System

The series 1205 pipe support system has been developed to accommodate the many different types of pipe support designs which have proven expensive to adopt in stainless steel. The unique design enables a multitude of design options all based on the Series 1205 bossed clip.

The Series 1205 clip can be used to clamp, guide or hang pipes in position with a minimum of basic components. Because these components can be used in a variety of ways, a complicated support system can be built with the minimum of technical design input.

A matrix of 1205 bossed clips can be built, hanging pipes from each other


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